IAPT’s Training Fails But CBT Can Make a Real World Difference

three papers just published in the journal Cognitive Therapy and Research, tell contrasting stories: two are by leading lights in IAPT assessing the competence of trainees, in neither study did they demonstrate any real world outcome. By contrast in a study by Perrin et al (2019) of individual CBT for children (aged 10 to 18) suffering from generalised anxiety disorder 80% no longer had GAD by the end of 10 sessions of treatment compared to 0% in the waiting list.   These impressive results were maintained at 3 month follow up.

IAPT could learn from the Perrin et al (2019) study in that client’s diagnostic status was assessed using  a standardised diagnostic interview  and again at the end of treatment using blind assessors, further therapists followed an evidence based protocol for the identified disorder. Whilst it is costly to make such rigorous assessments and IAPT might fear having to explain to Clinical Commissioning Groups the necessary change in modus operandi, IAPT might then at last make a socially significant difference.

IAPT has been provisionally scheduled to be the focus of presentations on BBC TV and Radio on Wednesday, November 13th. 

Perrin et al (2019) Cognitive Therapy and Research (2019) 43:1051–1064
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-019-10020-3

Liness et al (2019) Cognitive Therapy and Research (2019) 43:959–970
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-019-10024-z

Liness et al (2019) Cognitive Therapy and Research (2019) 43:631–641
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-018-9987-5

Dr Mike Scott