Soothing, Improvement and Recovery – vested interests in muddying the waters

The list of those with a vested interest in consciously or non-consciously muddying the waters of mental health outcomes (fake news) is staggering and include Charities, IAPT and Independent Practitioners. Consumers, Businesses and Clinical Commissioning Groups beware!

Most client’s of mental health services are glad of the help proferred, they find them ‘soothing’ but this is a far cry from recovery from identifiable disorder. I’ve just put ‘Voltarol’ on my sprained ankle it is soothing, less of a burning sensation, but it doesn’t actually speed up the rate of recovery or increase gait velocity (improvement). Recovery would be back to what I was before I crumpled getting out of the taxi. Blurring the distinction between soothing, improvement and recovery is good for the marketing of a product, analgesic/wares of a mental health service provider, but the ‘injured’ are not well served and ill equipped to protest. As a consequence the juggernaut of existing services continues. There is a pressing need to go beyond expressions of client satisfaction.

 

E-cigarettes look like a good way of helping people giving up smoking cigarettes, but the long term effects are unknown, a Parliamentary Committee has just been appointed to look at the matter. There is an understandable wariness about wide dissemination in the abscence of evidence.  But there is no such critical awareness when it comes to mental health.

 

Dr Mike Scott

Disseminating Group CBT – What You Need To Know

Clients often have similar stories, so it is a no-brainer to treat those with the same story in a group. But groups can go badly wrong – a colleague of mine was unavailable to lead a group because of illness, one of the group ‘stepped-in’ and ran the group at his flat, suggesting that he would be a much better group leader!

On September 6th I am giving a 1 Day Workshop on Delivering Group CBT to Bedford IAPT, one of many I have delivered to BABCP local Groups and IAPT. In 2013 when I gave the workshop in Copenhagen I discovered that  there Group CBT is the usual mode of service provision and therapists have to justify individual therapy, they found it surprising that in the UK we  did not operate that way. There are free group materials for depression, anxiety disorders and PTSD if you click the Resources button on this site, from Simply Effective Group Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (2011) London: Routledge. The Workshops have raised a whole host of questions that might be worth discussions in your locality and/or on this forum:

 

 

The learning objectives for the Delivering Group CBT workshop are for attendees to be able to answer most of the following questions by the end of the day:

  1. How do we ensure that we don’t play a numbers game with regards to groups?
  2. Why not admit all-comers?
  3. Aren’t classes a better use of resources than groups?
  4. How do we select the right people?
  5. Is group CBT really an answer to a Manager’s prayer?
  6. How do you identify and circumvent special problems in marketing group CBT?
  7. How can you integrate individual and group cbt?
  8. What is the structure of a session?
  9. What might the session by session content look like for depression and the anxiety disorders?
  10. How do you capitalise on group members assembling and/or departing?
  11. Do you have to specify groundrules?
  12. How do I handle clients with more than one disorder/difficulty in a group?
  13. How do you handle the difficult client?
  14. How do I know if the group is making a socially significant, real world difference?
  15. Which groups are best to start with?
  16. How do I manage group processes?
  17. How can I know whether I am managing group processes well?
  18. How does group cbt compare to individual cbt in terms of effectiveness?
  19. What if you are expected to run a group alone?
  20. How do you divide up the work between leader and co-leader?
  21. How should leader and co-leader debrief each other?
  22. Can you really do Socratic dialogue in a group?
  23. Are there advantages to a story telling/narrative approach in groups?
  24. What are useful materials?
  25. What can you do if your supervisor has no experience of group CBT?                                                    Dr Mike Scott